Short Courses

A full program of training workshops and short courses will be provided as part of the conference. All of these are scheduled for Sunday 15th September. Cost is $650 full day and $350 for ½ day. Fees are inclusive of GST.

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The following Workshops have been confirmed:

Full day workshops

AM ½ day workshops

PM ½ day workshops

Full details will be posted as workshops are confirmed.

Full Day Workshops

Workshop 1: Advancements in petroleum vapour intrusion investigation and mitigation

08:30 -17:00 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $650

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Workshop coordinator: John Boyer

Workshop overview: Regulatory agencies and industry are utilising vast resources on petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) evaluations that may not be necessary due to the lack of a technical understanding of the current science. At potential PVI sites there is often uncertainty as to the best approach to assess, investigate, and manage sites. This uncertainty leads to inconsistent and slow decision making, and in some cases a lack of confidence in the protection of human health. The challenge is to identify those sites requiring a typical investigation and screen out unnecessary sites while still protecting public health.

Who should attend: Practitioners, regulators, site managers, engineers, remediation scientists and others involved vapour intrustion assessment and prevention.

Workshop 2: Contaminated land as a legacy of mining - past, present and future

08:30 - 17:00 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $650

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Workshop coordinator: Peter Di Marco

Workshop overview: By their very nature, mining activities pose a high risk for soil and water contamination unless appropriate management practices are in place. In the past, particularly early in the last century, the approaches to sustainable environmental practices have been less than desirable, resulting in a large number of contaminated sites from the mining. The contamination is not restricted to the mining site, it can also occur along transport corridors (e.g. the railway line corridor from Broken Hill to Port Pirie) and distal to the mining site because of erosion (soil and surface waters) or leaching into ground water. The geographical distribution of the contamination may not be known or knowable. The contamination has caused disease in the past (Wittenoom,Port Pirie) and will likely do so in the future as population increases, urban areas expand and people move out of the capital cities.

Half Day Workshops - Morning

Workshop 3: Integrated DNAPL site remediation strategy

09:00-12:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350.

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Workshop coordinator:Naji Akladiss

Workshop overview: This short course is based on 2011 ITRC IDSS-1 training, “Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy.” (www.itrcweb.org)

Who should attend: This IDSS training is intended for regulators, remedial project managers, and remediation engineers responsible for sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Attendees should be familiar with the latest evolution of site characterisation challenges; realistic planning of site restoration; evolving treatment techniques; and evaluating, monitoring and interpreting mass transport in the subsurface aqueous and vapor phases. In addition to chlorinated solvent contaminated sites, other types of contaminated sites (e.g. petroleum, mixed contaminants, etc.) will also benefit from this workshop.

Workshop 4: Insitu bioremediation for the practitioner

08:30 -12:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350

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Workshop coordinator: Maureen C. Leahy

Workshop overview: The understanding and application of biological treatment for environmental contaminants has made huge advances in the past 30 years, but many practitioners still rely on vendors of commercial products and tools for their information. This workshop is aimed at providing practitioners with an understanding of the factors involved in choosing bioremediation over other technologies, selecting the right amendments and monitoring the performance of the implementation.

Who should attend: This course is intended for professionals who are involved in environmental remediation, as well as environmental managers and regulators who oversee remediation projects and students who are hoping to make the transition between academics and the field. Attendees do not need any previous experience with bioremediation, but a basic understanding of in situ remediation for environmental contaminants will be helpful.

Workshop 5: Detailed site characterisation: Approaches, outcomes and managing the data

08:30 -12:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350

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Workshop coordinator: David Reynolds

Workshop overview: Site investigation is a process of reducing uncertainty, with the eventual aim of the development of a conceptual site model (CSM) that is appropriate for the remedial objectives of the site. While there has been a strong recent focus on developing new site diagnostic tools and approaches to characterising source zones (e.g. architecture, mass, mass discharge) and plume behaviour (e.g. preferential flow paths, concentration distribution, mass flux), only recently have generic tools been developed to assist site managers, regulators, engineers and remediation scientists to determine how to combine existing and new approaches to arrive at a level of site characterisation suitable for an intended purpose. Costeffective site characterisation is important when determining the feasibility of treatment approaches, to assess process performance during operation, and to reduce the uncertainty of long-term performance through support for optimisation strategies. This course will focus not only on the tools for detailed site characterisation (particularly their benefits and limitations) but also on the process of selecting data, determining the worth of data, and techniques and holistic approaches for the integration and visualisation of the data.

Who should attend: Practitioners, regulators, site managers, engineers, remediation scientists and others involved in site investigation should attend this training course to learn more about up-todate strategies for site characterisation.

Half Day Workshops - Afternoon

Workshop 6: Measurement and use of Mass Discharge and Mass Flux to improve decisions at contaminated sites

13:30 -17:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350

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Workshop coordinator:Naji Akladiss

Workshop overview: This short course is based on 2010 ITRC Massflux-1 training, “Use and measurement of mass flux and mass discharge.” (www.itrcweb.org)

Who should attend: Practitioners, regulators, and others working on groundwater sites should attend this training course to learn more about various methods and potential uses of mass flux and mass discharge.

Workshop 7: Insitu thermal remediation

13:30 - 17:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350

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Workshop coordinators: Gorm Heron and Grant Geckeler

Workshop overview: The workshop will include an overview of the theory and application of in situ thermal methods to the remediation of contaminated sites in North America and Europe, including steam enhanced extraction, electrical resistive heating,thermal conductive heating and gas fired conductive methods.

Who should attend: Practitioners, regulators, and others working on in situ thermal methods should attend this training course.

Workshop 8: Applying sustainability principles to remediation in ANZ

13:30 - 17:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350

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Workshop coordinator: Garry Smith

Workshop overview: International and ANZ experience confirms that inclusion of relevant sustainability considerations in contaminated sites remediation project planning and practice provides a means to:

  • demonstrate the effectiveness of a proposed project from the triple bottom line (TBL) perspective;
  • efficiently address project risk-based outcomes and financial costs; and
  • meet government and societal expectations with respect to sustainable development.

Sustainable Remediation (SR) practice also has important contributions to make to emerging cross-disciplinary sustainable development practices in land-use planning (‘brownfields development’), urban design (‘urban renewal’) and transport (‘transit oriented development’).

Who should attend: This workshop is relevant to a wide-range of remediation industry practitioners including remediators, regulators, urban planners, sustainability policy developers, and communicators.

Workshop 9: Horizontal drilling techniques

13:30 -17:30 Sunday 15 September. Fee - $350

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Workshop coordinator: Mike Sequino

Workshop overview: This horizontal remediation well (HRW) workshop will discuss the use of HRWs to broaden the spectrum of in situ remediation and mitigation methods that work more effectively when implemented and will include enhanced bioremediation, chemical oxidation, multiple phase extraction, in situ thermal remediation, hydraulic barriers, air sparging, soil vapour extraction, and subslab depressurisation to mitigate vapour intrusion.

Who should attend: Practitioners, regulators, site managers, engineers, geologists, remediation scientists and others involved in site investigation should attend this training course to learn more about current strategies for in-situ remediation.